Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of the PMR - Pridnestrovie - Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica - Transnistria - ПМР Приднестровье марки Каталог

Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of the PMR

Pridnestrovie - Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica. Also Known as Transnistria
ПМР Приднестровье марки Каталог

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PMR - Pridnestrovie - Historical Background

Map of PMR (Transnistria) - Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of the PMR - Pridnestrovie - Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica - Transnistria - ПМР Приднестровье марки Каталог

Historical Background

The end of the 18th century marked the Russian and Ukrainian colonization in this region, with the aim of defending what was at the time the Imperial Russian south-western border.

After the Soviet Revolution, the region was part of the Moldavian Autonomous Oblast in the Ukrainian SSR. Romanian speakers still made up a significant portion of the inhabitants of the region and Romanian-language schools were opened.

After World War II, it was included with Bessarabia into the Moldavian SSR in exchange for the Southern Bessarabia which was included in the Ukrainian SSR.

In the 1940's, Transnistria (as it was then called) suffered as many ethnic Romanians were deported to Siberia and Kazakhstan and were replaced by Ukrainians and Russians. Most ethnic Romanians were allowed to return in the 50's, during the process of de-Stalinisation.

Most industry that was built in the Moldavian SSR was concentrated in Pridnestrovie, while the rest of Moldova had a predominantly agricultural economy. In 1990, Pridnestrovie accounted for 40% of Moldova's GDP and 90% of its electricity production.

The 14th Soviet army has been based there since 1956 and was kept there after the fall of the Soviet Union to safeguard what is probably the biggest weapons stockpile and ammunition depot in Europe, which was set up in Soviet times for possible operations on the South-eastern Theatre in the event of World War III. Russia is rather half-heartedly negotiating with Pridnestrovie and Ukraine for transit rights to be able to evacuate the military material back to Russia.

Population & Economics

Population Population of the region is 633,600 (2001). At the last census of 1989, the population was 546,400.

Recently, there has been a substantial emigration from the region due to economic hardships of the 1990s. This is one of the reasons why a disproportionately large part of the population is past the age of retirement.

The GDP is about $420 million (*) and the GDP per capita, based on the exchange rate, is $662, making the area slightly wealthier than Moldova overall but still one of the poorest parts of Europe.

The Civil War

In 1989, the Moldovans in the capital of Chişinău, often called Kishinev in English, declared Moldovan (actually Romanian) to be the official language, and talks began regarding reunification with Romania. The Slavs on the left bank of the Dniester River declared their own Republic on September 2, 1990 and a civil war broke out in 1992, taking roughly 1,500 lives. The war was ended after a cease-fire was negotiated by the Moldovan, PMR, Russian and Ukrainian representatives.

A part of the cease-fire agreement was a Russian peacekeeping force in the region: a controversial action to some, a necessary guarantee of protection to others. Ever since, the Moldovan government has had no actual authority over the PMR region.

Although an agreement with Moldova was signed in 1994 to withdraw all the Russian troops from PMR, it was never ratified by the Russian State Duma.

In July 2004, a PMR separatist leader declared that the separatist entity would organize a referendum in the autumn of 2004 on whether PMR would become part of the Russian Federation, even though the region has no common border with Russia.

The 2004 Crisis

 The separatist PMR authorities began forcibly closing schools that used Romanian language in Latin script, and several teachers and parents who opposed the closures were arrested. The Moldovan government decided to create a blockade that would isolate the autonomous republic from the rest of the country. The PMR retaliated by a series of actions meant to destabilize the economic situation in Moldova: since, during the Soviet times, most of the power plants in Moldova were built in PMR, this crisis generated power outages in parts of Moldova.

Currently the OSCE, with former Bulgarian president Petur Stoyanov as lead negotiator, are negotiating to resolve the situation.

Berdery City - Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of the PMR - Pridnestrovie - Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica - Transnistria - ПМР Приднестровье марки Каталог

View of Bendery on the Dniester River

Tiraspol City - Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of the PMR - Pridnestrovie - Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica - Transnistria - ПМР Приднестровье марки Каталог

Government Buildings in Tiraspol

War memorial in Bendery - Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of the PMR - Pridnestrovie - Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica - Transnistria - ПМР Приднестровье марки Каталог

War Memorial in Bendery